Info1103 Assignment Discovery

University

  1. Australian Catholic University
    1. ARTS112 Art and Design History and Theory 1
    2. BIOL121 Human Biological Science 1
    3. BIOL326 Applied Science 5
    4. HLSC110 Beginning Professional Practice
    5. HLSC111 The Person, Health and wellbeing
    6. HLSC120 Society, Culture and Health
    7. HLSC210 Mental Health and Illness
    8. HLSC220 Health Care Ethics
    9. NRSG353 Acute Care 2
    10. PHIL102 Theories of Human Nature
  2. Australian National University
    1. BUSN7008 Financial Statements and Reporting
    2. ECON2013/6013 Behavioural Economics: Psychology and Economics
    3. FINM7006 Foundations of Finance
    4. STAT7055 FINANCIAL STATISTICS
    1. BCFN01-003 Foundation Maths
    2. BCFN01-006 Introduction to economics
    3. BCFN01-007 Organisational Communication and Behaviour
    4. BCFN01-008 History of Western Thought
    5. BCFN01-018 Social Anthropology
    6. BCFN01-019 Introduction to Information Technology
    7. CORE11-100 Communication Skills
    8. CORE11-120 Cultural and Ethical Values
    9. INFT11-110 Introduction to Programming
    10. SSUD71-101 Understanding Buildings
    11. SSUD71-103 Principles of Project Management
    12. SSUD71-308 Project Contract Administration
    13. SSUD71-318_142 Environmental Management and Climate Change
    14. STAT10-100 Elementary Maths
  3. Central Queensland University
    1. ACCT11057 Principles of Accounting
    2. ACCT11059 Using Accounting for Decision Making
    3. ACCT11079 Basic Principles of Accounting
    4. ACCT19061 Corporate Accounting
    5. ACCT19083 Corporate Governance & Ethics
    6. ACCT19084 Financial Accounting
    7. BLO5540 Business and Company Law
    8. COIS11011 Foundations of Business Computing
    9. COIS11078 Business Information Systems
    10. COIS12073 Enterprise Systems
    11. COIT11222 Programming Fundamentals
    12. COMM11003 Professional and Technical Communication
    13. COMM12030 Desktop Publishing
    14. COSI10020 Web Development
    15. ECON11029 Introduction to Economics
    16. ECON19033 Macroeconomics
    17. EDED11449 Principles of University Learning
    18. EDED11451 University Learning
    19. FAHE13004 The Global Future
    20. FINC19011 Business Finance
    21. HRMT11010 Organisational Behaviour
    22. HRMT11011 Human Resources in Organisations
    23. HRMT11013 Human Resource Management
    24. HRMT19012 Performance Management
    25. HRMT19013 Human Resource Development
    26. HRMT19014 Human Resources Planning, Recruitment & Selection
    27. HRMT19016 Contemporary Organisational &HRM Studies
    28. HRMT19020 Managing Organisational Change
    29. HRMT19021 Principles of Employment Relations
    30. HRMT19023 HRM Competencies
    31. HRMT19106 Supply Chain Management
    32. HRMT20023 Contemporary Studies in Human Resource Management
    33. LAWS11030 Introductory and Contract Law
    34. LAWS19032 Company and Association Law
    35. LITR19047 Science Fiction and Film
    36. MGMT11109 Introduction to Management
    37. MGMT11165 MGMT11165
    38. MGMT19103 Logistics Management
    39. MGMT19105 Quality Management
    40. MGMT19106 Supply Chain Management
    41. MGMT19114 Strategic Management
    42. MGMT19126 Production and Operations Management
    43. MGMT19128 Business Integration
    44. MGMT5050 TEAMS, ETHICS AND COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE
    45. MMST11002 Web Design
    46. MRKT11028 Interactive and Internet Marketing
    47. MRKT11030 The Marketing Function
    48. MRKT19030 Promotions Management
    49. MRKT19031 Consumer Behaviour
    50. MRKT19034 Entrepreneurship, Innovation and New Ventures
    51. MRKT19036 Marketing of Service Products
    52. MRKT19037 International Marketing
    53. MRKT19038 Marketing Research
    54. MRKT19049 Customer Relationship Marketing
    55. MRKT20021 Buyer Behaviour
    56. MRKT20027 Internet and Electronic Marketing
    57. STAT11048 Essential Statistics
    1. 10852 Organisational Behaviour 200
    2. 11001 Macroeconomics 200
    3. 11018 Managing Change 300
    4. Business Law 100
    5. CIB 100 Communication in Business
    6. CIB1100 Communication in Business
    7. Communication in Business 100
    8. Comparative Management 601
    9. Economics 100
    10. Environmental Issues in Business 501
    11. Global Business 650
    12. Global Distribution and Transportation 501
    13. International Human Resource Management 650
    14. Management 560
    15. Management Accounting 201
    16. Systems Analysis and Design 251
    1. 1001EHR Employment Relations
    2. 1001GIR International Relations
    3. 1001HSL Foundation Studies
    4. 1002HSL Introduction to Research
    5. 1003GIR Globalisation the Asia-Pacific and Australia
    6. 1003MKT Introduction to Marketing
    7. 1004GIR 1004PPP 2004PPP 1184GIR Government Business Relations
    8. 1005IBA Introduction to International Business
    9. 1007ICT Computer Systems and Networks
    10. 1008IBA An Introduction to Asia
    11. 1008ICT Business Informatics
    12. 1083MKT Introduction to Marketing
    13. 1101AFE Accounting Principles
    14. 1101IBA Management Concepts
    15. 1102AFE Accounting for Decision Making
    16. 1109HSL Introduction to International Tourism and Hotel Management
    17. 1181AFE Accounting Principles
    18. 1181IBA Management Concepts
    19. 1183AFE Accounting Information Systems
    20. 1184GIR Government-Business Relations
    21. 1203AFE Money Banking and Finance
    22. 1204HSL Intro to Event Management
    23. 1205LAL Professional English Effective Communication in Workplace Settings
    24. 1206HSL Food beverage
    25. 1209HSL Introduction to Hotel Management
    26. 1209QCA Mapping the Postmodern
    27. 1220HSL Information Systems for Services Industries
    28. 1303AFE Economics for Decision Making 1
    29. 1304AFE Business Statistics
    30. 1382AFE Money, Banking and Finance
    31. 1383AFE Economics for Decision Making 1
    32. 1384AFE Business Statistics
    33. 2001EHR Management Employee Relations
    34. 2001IBA Chinese Political Economy and Business
    35. 2002EHR Human Resource Management Principles
    36. 2002IBA Microeconomics of Business Strategy
    37. 2003EHR HR Training & Development
    38. 2004MKT Consumer Psychology
    39. 2004PSY Occupational Psychology
    40. 2005EHR Organisational Behaviour
    41. 2005GIR Governments, Markets and Communities
    42. 2005IBA Comparative Management
    43. 2006EHR Health & Safety in the Workplace
    44. 2007GIR Legal Issues for Managers
    45. 2008EHR Business Communication
    46. 2009EHR Recruitment & Selection
    47. 2013IBA Managing People in the Global Economy
    48. 2020IBA Global Security
    49. 2023IBA International Marketing
    50. 2025MGT Organisational processes
    51. 2027ENV Planning Practice
    52. 2029MKT Advertising and Creative Strategies
    53. 2034MKT Marketing Research
    54. 2036MKT Retail Marketing
    55. 2101AFE International Accounting
    56. 2102AFE Financial Accounting
    57. 2103AFE Company Accounting
    58. 2104AFE Management Accounting
    59. 2105AFE Introduce to Business Law
    60. 2105HSL International Tourism and Hotel Marketing
    61. 2106AFE Company Law
    62. 2128IBA Business Processes
    63. 2150IBA Intro to Supply Chain Mgt
    64. 2185AFE Introduction to Business Law
    65. 2201AFE Corporate Finance
    66. 2202AFE Risk Management and Insurance
    67. 2202LAL Beyond What is Said
    68. 2204AFE Financial Institutions Mngment
    69. 2204HSL Sustainable Tourism
    70. 2206AFE Investment Analysis & Management
    71. 2208HSL International Food & Beverage Management
    72. 2209HSL Project Management
    73. 2211AFE Real Estate Finance
    74. 2212HSL Work Integrated Learning Practicum
    75. 2214AFE Derivatives Securities
    76. 2216HSL Rooms Division Management
    77. 2301HSL Evaluation and Impact Assessment
    78. 2303AFE Economics for Decision Making 2
    79. 2304HSL Hospitality Marketing
    80. 2305AFE Intermediate Microeconomics
    81. 2305HSL Tourism and Hospitality Economics
    82. 2306AFE Quantitative Methods for Business Finance & Economics
    83. 2308HSL Destination Management
    84. 2310HSL Sport Facility and Planning
    85. 2315HSL Event Marketing & Sponsorship
    86. 2506QCA Typographic Design 2
    87. 2567QCA Graphic Design 1
    88. 2568QCA Graphic Design 2
    89. 2569QCA 3D Design for Public Spaces
    90. 2578QCA Digital Graphic Design
    91. 2579QCA Typographic Design 1
    92. 2584QCA Digital Environments
    93. 3001EHR Negotiation
    94. 3001HSL Strategy and Change - A Service Industry Approach
    95. 3001IBA International Trade and Competition
    96. 3003IBA International Corporate Finance
    97. 3004IBA Inter-Cultural Management
    98. 3006IBA International Business Ethics & Corporate Governance
    99. 3007ENV Climate Change Adaptation
    100. 3008EHR WORKPLACE INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
    101. 3008GIR Human Rights in World Politics
    102. 3009IBA Politics in Contemporary China
    103. 3010EHR Training and Development
    104. 3011EHR Performance Management
    105. 3012EHR Applied Strategic Organisational Change
    106. 3012HUM Australian Screen
    107. 3012IBA The Social Context of Asian Business
    108. 3012LAL Chinese & English Business Interpreting I
    109. 3013LAL Chinese & English Business Interpreting II
    110. 3013MKT Entertainment & Arts Marketing
    111. 3014LAL Chinese & English Written Communication I
    112. 3015LAL Chinese & English Written Communication II
    113. 3016MKT Channel Strategy in Marketing
    114. 3020IBA Applied Financial Management
    115. 3027IBA Business and Politics in the Asia Pacific Region
    116. 3028IBA Energy & Environmental Security
    117. 3028MKT Strategic Marketing Simulation
    118. 3033IBA Managing People in a Global Economy
    119. 3040MKT Internet Marketing
    120. 3041MKT Entrepreneurial Marketing
    121. 3042MKT Strategic International Marketing
    122. 3101AFE 7101AFE Accounting Theory and Practice
    123. 3102AFE Auditing
    124. 3106AFE,7106AFE Revenue Law,Income Tax Law for Accountants
    125. 3112IBA Management Strategy & Decision Making
    126. 3113ENG Civil Engineering Design Project
    127. 3113HSL International Tourism and Hotel Destination Development
    128. 3113IBA Corp Social Responsibility
    129. 3117HSL Facility and Venue Management
    130. 3118HSL Planning Sustainable Communities
    131. 3119HSL Ecotourism
    132. 3120HSL Mnging Culturally Diverse Wpls
    133. 3129PBH 7401PBH Social Action for Sustainability and Health
    134. 3144IBA Quality Management
    135. 3201HSL Risk, Crisis and Disaster Management
    136. 3202LAL Intercultural English in an Age of Globalisation
    137. 3204HSL Evaluation and Impact Assess
    138. 3206HSL Hospitality Marketing
    139. 3207HSL Entrepreneurship in Tourism, Hospitality, Sport and Events
    140. 3208AFE Portfolio Management
    141. 3209AFE International Finance
    142. 3210AFE Advanced Corporate Finance
    143. 3210HSL Contemporary Issues in Tourism and Hotel Management
    144. 3212HSL Marketing and Sales for Tourism and Hotels
    145. 3213AFE Credit and Lending
    146. 3213HSL Conference and Convention Management
    147. 3215HSL Hotel Service Operations Management
    148. 3216AFE Sustainable Investing
    149. 3224HSL Community Events and Festivals
    150. 3302AFE Monetary Economics
    151. 3304HSL Business and Economics of Sport
    152. 3305AFE Applied Econometrics
    153. 3307AFE International Economics
    154. 3307HSL Tourism Small Bus Mgmt
    155. 3323HSL Sport Marketing
    156. 3412ICT Software Architecture
    157. 3440ICT Theory of Computation
    158. 3538QCA Industry Project
    159. 3544QCA Typography for Screen Design
    160. 5901LAL Language and Communication for Business and Commerce
    161. 5904LAL Language and Communication for Arts and Social Sciences
    162. 7001MKT Corporate Communications
    163. 7002EHR Evidence-based Practice in HRM
    164. 7002ICT Systems Analysis and Design
    165. 7002MKT eCust Relationship Marketing
    166. 7003ICT Database Design
    167. 7004IBA Trade Investment and Economic Policy in Asia
    168. 7008IBA Global Business Strategy
    169. 7009IBA Knowledge Management for Product Innovation
    170. 7011CAL English Communication for IT Professionals
    171. 7011EHR HRM Strategy
    172. 7012EHR Organisational Change
    173. 7013EHR Performance and Reward Management
    174. 7020EHR Managing Diversity
    175. 7021EHR Leadership and Self Development
    176. 7024EHR International and Comparative Human Resource Management and Employment Relations
    177. 7024MKT Retail Branding & Innovation
    178. 7032MKT Strategic Marketing
    179. 7101AFE Financial Accounting Theory
    180. 7101ICT Professional Practice in IT
    181. 7105AFE Principles of Business Law
    182. 7107MKT Franchising
    183. 7109HSL Leisure Industries
    184. 7111AFE Accounting
    185. 7112IBA Globalisation & Corporate Social responsibility
    186. 7113IBA Mobile Workforce Technologies
    187. 7114IBA Information Management and Control
    188. 7115IBA Managing Complex Projects
    189. 7116AFE Corporations Law
    190. 7116IBA Resource Management
    191. 7117IBA Business Intelligence Systems
    192. 7118IBA Information Policy and Governance
    193. 7150AFE Business Information Systems
    194. 7153AFE Ethics and Governance
    195. 7154AFE Financial Reporting
    196. 7201hsl Operations Management - A Service Industry Approach
    197. 7202AFE Financial Planning
    198. 7202HSL Tourism and Hospitality Marketing
    199. 7203AFE Corp Financial Risk Management
    200. 7204HSL Strategic Management in Tourism, Event and Sport
    201. 7206MKT Services Sector Marketing and Operations
    202. 7207MKT Market Research
    203. 7209HSL Tourism Management
    204. 7209MKT Integrated Marketing Communication
    205. 7210MKT Advanced Consumer Decision Making
    206. 7210PBH Indigenous Health
    207. 7214AFE Retirement and Estate Planning
    208. 7218HSL Understanding Research in Tourism & Hospitality, Sport & Events
    209. 7227HSL Event Coordination and Logistics
    210. 7228HSL Business Event Management
    211. 7231HSL Sustainable Event Operations and Management
    212. 7303AFE Economics
    213. 7305PBH Health Workforce
    214. 7310AFE 7310AFE
    215. 7343HSL Contemporary Sport and Event Marketing
    216. 7404ICT Services Planning and Management
    217. 7621ICT Project Management
    218. 7921IBA International Business
    219. 9001GIC Academic Communication for Postgraduate Students
    220. 9002GIC Intercultural Issues for Pgrad
    221. EHR303 Performance Management
    222. IBA304 Inter-Cultural Management
    223. IBA306 International Business Ethics & Corporate Governance
    1. BSBCON601B Develop and Maintain Business Continuity Plans
    2. BSBINN601B Manage Organisational Change
    3. BSBMGT502B Manage People Performance
    4. BSBMGT605B Provide Leadership Across the Organisation
    5. BSBMGT616A Develop and Implement Strategic Plans
    6. BSBWOR501B Manage Personal Work Priorities and Professional Development
    1. HA2011 Management Accounting
    2. HA3051 Accounting Theory
    3. HC1011 Introduction to Accounting
    4. HC1052 ORGANISATIONAL BEHAVIOUR
    5. HC1072 Economics and International Trade
    6. HC2022 Marketing Research
    7. HC2101 Performance Management
    8. HC2112 Services and Relatioinship Marketing
    9. HC2121 Comparative Business Ethics and Social Responsibility
    10. HC3141 INTERNATIONAL STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT
    11. HC3152 E-business Applications
    12. HK2011 Buyer Behaviour
    1. BU1002 BU1902 Accounting for Decision Making
    2. BU1003 Business Economics
    3. BU1009 BUSINESS INFORMATION SYSTEMS
    4. BU1104 Business, Environment and Society in the Tropics
    5. BU1108 Managing Consumer Markets
    6. BU1112 Business Law
    7. BU1904 Management, People and Organisations
    8. BU1908 Marketing Fundamentals
    9. BU2004 Financial Management
    10. BU2005 Entrepreneurship
    11. BU2006 Business Modelling
    12. BU2007 BUSINESS DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION
    13. BU2010 Business Research Methods
    14. BU2081 Consumer Behaviour
    15. BU2112 BX2112 Law of Business Organisations
    16. BU3041 Service Industries marketing
    17. BU3101 Professional Internship
    18. BU3112 TAXATION LAW
    19. BX2011 Accounting Principles and Systems
    20. BX2012 COST AND MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING
    21. BX2016 BUSINESS MODELLING
    22. BX2019 BUSINESS INFORMATION SYSTEMS
    23. BX2041 Club & Gaming Management
    24. BX2051 Strategic Human Resource Management
    25. BX2062 Operations Management
    26. BX2072 Managing Organisational Flexibility
    27. BX2081 Consumer Behaviour
    28. BX2082 Marketing Communications
    29. BX2083 Interactive Marketing
    30. BX2174 RESEARCH & DECISION MAKING FOR BUSINESS
    31. BX2195 Hospitality, Culture & People
    32. BX3011 Company Accounting
    33. BX3012 Contemporary Issues in Accounting
    34. BX3013 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT & CONTROL
    35. BX3014 Auditing
    36. BX3014 Auditing
    37. BX3031 MULTINATIONAL BUSINESS FINANCE
    38. BX3040 Hospitality Practicum
    39. BX3041 Service Industries Marketing
    40. BX3042 Service Quality Management
    41. BX3052 Cross-Cultural Management
    42. BX3072 SME Planning
    43. BX3081 Interactive Marketing
    44. BX3082 International Marketing
    45. BX3171 Organisational Behaviour
    46. BX3172 Management Accounting for Non-Accountants
    47. BX3174 Management and Leadership
    48. CO5109 Corporate Finance
    49. CO5117 Introduction to Accounting
    50. CO5118 Auditing and Assurance Services
    51. CO5119 Business Law
    52. CO5124 Data Analysis and Decision Modelling
    53. CO5125 Economis for Managers
    54. CU1010 Effective Writing
    55. CU3021 Public Relations Campaigns
    56. CV1200 Effective Speaking
    57. LB5202 Marketing Management
    58. LB5203 Sustainable Enterprise
    59. LB5205 People in Organisations
    60. LB5207 Managing Entrepreneurial Enterprises
    61. LB5214 Current Business Issues
    62. LB5215 Strategy and Leadership
    63. LB5218 BUSINESS PLAN
    64. LB5229 Economics for a Sustainable World
    65. LB5302 Brand Management
    66. TO5202 Decision Making in the Hospitality Industry
    67. TO5203 Hospitality and Gastronomy Social, Private and Commercial
    1. ACC201 Financial Accounting 1
    2. ACC202 Accounting Information Systems
    3. ACC203 Financial Accounting 2
    4. ACC204 Corporations Law
    5. ACC205 Management Accounting 1
    6. ACC302 Auditing & Assurance
    7. ACC305 Management Accounting 2
    8. BUS101 Business Communication
    9. BUS102 Introduction to Management
    10. BUS103 Accounting For Managers
    11. BUS104 Economics
    12. BUS105 Business Information Systems
    13. BUS106 Marketing Principles
    14. BUS107 Commercial Law
    15. BUS108 Quantitative Analysis
    16. FIN203 Corporate Finance
    17. GB500 Business Perspectives
    18. GB512 Business Communications
    19. GB518 Financial Accounting Principles and Analysis
    20. GB519 Measurement and Decision Making
    21. GB540 Economics for Global Decision Makers
    22. GB550 Financial Management
    23. GB570 Managing the Value Chain
    24. GB580 Strategic Management
    25. GB600 Leadership Strategies for a Changing World
    26. GB601 MBA Capstone
    27. HAT203 Hospitality and Tourism Management
    28. HAT302 Food and Beverage Management
    29. HAT303 Accommodation Management
    30. HAT304 Emerging Issues in Hospitality and Tourism
    31. HRM201 Human Resource Management
    32. HRM302 Managing Change
    33. HRM303 International Human Resource Management
    34. MAN201 Organisational Behaviour
    35. MAN202 Business Ethics
    36. MKT203 Services Marketing
    1. ACC1AMD
    2. ACC2CAD Cost Accounting & Decision Making
    3. ACC2CRE Corporate Reporting
    4. ACC2MAC Management Accounting and Control
    5. ACC3AFA ADVANCED FINANCIAL ACCOUNT
    6. BUS1MIS Management Information Systems
    7. BUS1MIS Management Information Systems
    8. BUS3EIS ENTERPRISE INFORMATION SYSTEMS
    9. CSE2AIF Artificial Intelligence Fundamentals
    10. CSE2DBF Database Fundamentals
    11. CSE2NEF Network Engineering Fundamentals
    12. CSE3ALR ARTIF INTEL-LOGIC AND REASONIN
    13. CSE3PE Professional Environment
    14. CSE4MPC Mobile and Pervasive Computing
    15. DBA1MIC Microeconomics
    16. DBA1MPP Marketing Defined, Planned & Delivered
    17. ECO1IMA Macroeconomics
    18. ECO1SGB Global Business Today
    19. ECO2IQA Introduction to Quantitative Analysis
    20. ECO3ITR International Economic Theory & Policy
    21. FIN2FIN Finance
    22. FIN3IFM International Financial Management
    23. LST2BSL Introduction to Business Law
    24. LST2LBA Law of Business Association
    25. LST2LBA Law of Business Association
    26. MGT1FOM Foundations of Management
    27. MGT2OBE ORGANISATIONAL BEHAVIOUR
    28. MKT1MDP Marketing Principles and Practice
    29. STA1CTS Critical Thinking with Statistics
    1. ACBE100 Academic Communication in Business and Economics
    2. ACCG 301 Organisational Planning and Control
    3. ACCG 308 Corporate Accounting and Reporting
    4. ACCG100 ACCOUNTING 1A
    5. ACCG101 ACCOUNTING 1B
    6. ACCG399 Issues in Accounting Theory and Practice
    7. ACCG611 Principles of Accounting
    8. ACCG615 Quantitative Methods
    9. ACCG825 Management Accounting: Strategy and Control
    10. ACCG828 Management Control Systems
    11. ACCG835 International Accounting
    12. ACCG845 Performance Measurement and Management
    13. ACCG846 International Taxation
    14. ACCG847 Forensic Accounting
    15. ACCG848 Business and Professional Ethics
    16. ACCG851 Business Law
    17. ACCG854 Company Law
    18. ACCG871 Advanced Corporate Accounting
    19. ACCG872 Advanced Financial Reporting

Bachelor of Design Computing Units of Study

Table B: Bachelor of Design Computing and Bachelor of Design Computing/Bachelor of Advanced Studies - core units of study

Junior units of study

Candidates in the Bachelor of Design Computing and Bachelor of Design Computing/Bachelor of Advanced Studies are required to completed all DECO1000 level units.

DECO1012 Design Programming


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kazjon Grace Session: Semester 1 Classes: seminar and tutorial 3hrs/wk Assessment: Programming Assignments (80%); Tutorial Activities (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

This unit provides an introduction to the development of software in design and the creative industries. It teaches an understanding of the fundamentals of computational thinking as well as skills in the design and implementation of software for creative expression and prototyping. It introduces students to tools for building interactive design applications through programming assignments; knowledge of programming concepts; and knowledge of the Javascript programming language. Key concepts covered in this unit include: variables, functions, control flows, and algorithmic thinking. Students learn how to design through the development of code, allowing them to incorporate programming into their own design projects as well as to collaborate effectively with software developers.

DECO1006 Design Process and Methods


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Karla Straker Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture 1 hr/wk, tutorial 2 hrs/wk Assessment: Design Assignments (70%); Presentation (10%); Quizzes (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

This unit of study provides an overview of a human-centred approach to the design of interactive technologies and environments. It introduces students to design thinking and how it can be productively applied to different design situations. The unit covers theoretical concepts, methods and tools used in human-centred design, including user research, ideation, prototyping and user evaluation. It provides students with the principles, processes and tools that are used in commercial design projects. Students learn to build empathy with users, identify and reframe the problem space, develop design concepts and persuasively communicate design proposals with an emphasis on the user experience through visual storytelling.

DECO1008 3D Modelling and Fabrication


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Madeleine Borthwick Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 1 hr/wk; tutorial 2 hrs/wk Prerequisites: DESA1555 Assessment: Design Concept and Visualisation (40%); Design Model (40%); Tutorial Activities (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

This unit teaches students an understanding of the basic concepts of modelling and prototyping 3D artefacts. Students will develop skills in creating and using 3D models for real-world and virtual environments. The unit further introduces students to rapid prototyping fabrication techniques, such as 3D printing and laser cutting with the aim to understand how to prepare a digital representation of artefacts (such as digital products or packaging) for physical fabrication. Students will learn how physical artefacts are represented in 3D digital models by modelling various 3D geometric entities, and how to create photorealistic representations that accurately and efficiently describe intent, structure, and geometric and surface variations of 3D models. Key concepts covered in this unit include: boundary representations, solid and parametric modelling, texture mapping, light sources, camera locations and projections.

DECO1013 Physical Computing


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Liam Bray Session: Semester 2 Classes: seminar and tutorial 3hrs/wk Prerequisites: DECO1006 or DECO2016 Assessment: Product Design Assignments (80%); Quizzes (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

This unit introduces students to the principles of product design and their application in interaction design projects. This includes conceptualising computer-based implementations of product interfaces, and using hardware platforms, such as Arduinos or littleBits, for prototyping physical computing interfaces. It introduces the core concepts of physical prototyping, basic electronic concepts, hardware programming, as well as aesthetic issues in product design. The unit covers: prototyping techniques for physical user interfaces, methods of programming and assessing interactive products, knowledge of a range of product design techniques, especially in relation to interactive contexts, and awareness of issues of aesthetics in physical computing interfaces.

DECO1014 Digital Media Production


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Caitilin de Berigny Session: Semester 1 Classes: seminar and tutorial 3hrs/wk Prohibitions: DECO1100 Assessment: Digital Media Project (80%); Quizzes (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

This unit introduces students to the principles of digital media production for moving image. In studying this unit, students will develop an understanding of how to document design projects, concepts or processes through digital moving image and video production. Key concepts covered in this unit include: video editing techniques, transitions, titles, colour grading, content and flow management. Using digital media tools, such as Final Cut Pro X, students will learn how to source, develop, design, and create video content.

DECO1015 Visual Communication


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Nathaniel Fay Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture 1 hr/wk (Week 1 only); tutorial 2 hrs/wk; online modules 1 hr/wk Prohibitions: DECO1100 or DAAE2009 or DECO2101 Assessment: Visual Design Assignments (80%); Quizzes (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

Note: This unit is for students enrolled in the Bachelor of Design Computing only. Students from other programs should enrol in DECO2101.

This unit of study introduces students to the principles of visual design, including graphic design, colour theory and typography. Students will develop an understanding of how to successfully combine visual elements to effectively communicate an idea or concept, to describe a product, and to represent visual user interface elements in an interactive product. Using digital image manipulation tools, such as Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign, students will learn how to develop design concepts and how to turn concepts into visual communication materials in the form of digital images.

DECO1016 Web Design and Technologies


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kazjon Grace Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 1 hr/wk (Week 1 only); tutorial 2 hrs/wk; online modules 1 hr/wk Prerequisites: DECO1012 Prohibitions: DECO2102 Assessment: Web Design Project (80%); Quizzes (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

Note: This unit is for students enrolled in the Bachelor of Design Computing only. Students enrolled in other programs should enrol in DECO2102.

This unit introduces students to web design and modern web technologies for the purpose of designing and prototyping web-based user interface solutions. Students will learn about design principles and patterns for the web and apply them in practical exercises that involve designing and creating interactive web applications. The unit will introduce web-based markup languages and frameworks for various media and platforms, such as desktop computers and mobile devices with a focus on interaction design. Students will develop an understanding of web technologies and their role in user experience and interaction design, including the use of web technologies for prototyping user interfaces. Prototyping techniques covered in this unit include scripting and markup languages for enabling dynamic content and interactive designs, such as HTML, CSS and JavaScript.

DECO1017 Principles of Animation


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Nathaniel Fay Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 1 hr/wk; tutorial 2 hrs/wk Prohibitions: DECO3006 Assessment: Animation Assignments (80%); Quizzes (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

Note: This unit is for students enrolled in the Bachelor of Design Computing only. Students enrolled in other programs should enrol in DECO3006.

This unit introduces students to the fundamental principles of animation and its role in interaction design. Students will develop an understanding of the process involved in developing character, text and motion graphics based animation, the integration between 2D artwork and 3D composition, and techniques and tools for audio recording and production to support animation. Assessments in this unit focus on the application of animation in user interface design as well as for the production of short animated films. Students will acquire basic animation skills, develop the skills to create an animated sequence, and learn the critical vocabulary to describe animation. Basic knowledge will be related to foundational technical skills in industry standard software for animation.

Senior units of study

Candidates in the Bachelor of Design Computing/Bachelor of Advanced Studies are required to complete 36 credit points of senior DECO units. Candidates in the Bachelor of Design Computing are required to complete 48 credit points of senior DECO units.

DECO2014 User Experience Design Studio


Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Madeleine Borthwick Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture 1 hr/wk, studio 3 hrs/wk, tutorial 2 hrs/wk Prerequisites: DECO1006 or DECO2016 Assessment: Design Project(s) (90%); Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

This unit introduces students to principles and methods relevant to the user experience design of digital products and services. Students will develop an understanding of the concept of 'user experience' and how it extends to other design practices, such as user interface design and interaction design. Students will learn about methods for designing the user experience in a range of different contexts, such as mobile devices, wearables, and interactive environments. The studio will give students an opportunity to apply the principles and methods of user experience design in the context of a design project. At the conclusion of the unit students will have a well-developed understanding of methods for gathering user requirements and translating requirements into design solutions that emphasise the user experience of the final product.

DECO2200 Interaction Design Studio


Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kazjon Grace Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 1 hr/wk, tutorial 2 hrs/wk, studio 3 hrs/wk Prerequisites: DECO1006 or DECO2016 Assessment: Design Project(s) (90%); Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

This unit introduces principles of interface and interaction design through design projects. Students will develop technical as well as methodological skills for designing and developing interactive products and services. Elements of interaction design including menus, screen design, animation, and graphics design will be addressed for various platforms, including online applications and mobile devices. The unit builds on the design methods introduced in DECO1006/DECO2016, such as user research, storyboarding, and prototyping. It allows students to develop an advanced understanding of these methods through applying them in a specific design context. Students will learn about methods for collecting user requirements, synthesising and visualising concepts, prototyping user interfaces, e.g. in the form of mobile apps, and evaluating prototypes.

DECO3100 Information Visualisation Design Studio


Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Somwrita Sarkar Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture 1 hr/wk, tutorial 2 hrs/wk, studio 3 hrs/wk Prerequisites: DECO1006 and DECO1012 Assessment: Design Project(s) (90%); Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

The field of information visualisation focuses on how data can be effectively represented and meaningfully communicated to people, in interactive and automated ways. The unit of study introduces the principles of information visualisation design, with special attention to aesthetic communication of data, data analytics, and user engagement. Key concepts covered in this unit include: abstract data visualisation; data acquisition; and parsing and processing of data. Using a combination of vector graphics software tools such as Adobe Illustrator and programming languages for processing data, students will develop information visualisations of real-world datasets that are both communicative and engaging. The unit will equip students with the skills to produce static as well as web-ready interactive data visualisations.

DECO3200 Interactive Product Design Studio


Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Caitilin de Berigny Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 1 hr/wk, tutorial 2 hrs/wk, studio 3 hrs/wk Prerequisites: DECO1006 and DECO1012 Assessment: Design Project(s) (90%); Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

This studio offers a context for students to apply design, technical and creative methods to the production of high-quality group work, with a strong focus on the development of high-impact portfolios. The studio allows students to apply methods and principles of human-centred design in the context of new product development, and to engage with new technologies for interactive product design. Assignments will take the form of flexible group projects, allowing students to develop proficiency in design and prototyping skills to a wide array of design problems that they may encounter in various industries. The unit will provide students with the skills to investigate and integrate advanced technologies into the design of objects with embedded information content and interactivity.

Electives

Please refer to the 'Requirements for award' section for the number of elective credit points required in your degree. Students who have completed 96 credit points with a WAM of at least 70 may substitute, with the permission of the unit coordinator concerned, graduate units from within the University.

Design Computing electives

Junior units of study

DESN1000 Principles of Design


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Cara Wrigley Session: Semester 1 Classes: lecture 1 hr/week; workshop 2 hrs/week Assessment: case study reports (60%), design exercise (30%) and quizzes (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

This unit of study allows students to develop an understanding of the foundation of human factors upon which much successful design is based. Students learn about the basic physical and cognitive principles (ergonomics, heuristics, human-centredness) incorporated in successful designs across a wide variety of different sectors. Students are provided with the tools to evaluate existing designs according to widely accepted design principles. They learn to apply these principles in practice in order to improve the usability, clarity and overall quality of their own designs. Through a series of academically researched case studies they reflect upon how these principles are applied in existing designs. To further develop their understanding of the design principles, they then complete a small re-design exercise. The case studies are chosen to cover a range of different domains, including products, systems, organisations, and services.

DESN1001 Design Theory and Culture


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Martin Tomitsch Session: Semester 2 Classes: lecture 1 hr/week; workshop 2 hrs/week Assessment: research report (30%), analysis report (30%), synthesis report (30%) nd quizzes (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

This unit of study helps students develop a theoretically grounded understanding of what design is, and the full spectrum of different disciplines that this term entails (product, graphic, urban planning, graphic, fashion, interaction, etc.). Using academic sources, they will investigate dominant historical and contemporary models of the design process, and learn about the cognitive basis of design thinking and how this differs from key skills in other disciplines. Students will research major design movements and schools of thought that have influenced the design sector over the last century (e.g. Bauhaus, eco-design, ergonomics, mass consumerism and built-in obsolescence). The unit teaches students about current foci in design (such as service design and experience design) and provides an outlook of upcoming trends and futures. Students will be able to develop these skills through studying a design movement, analysing case studies of designs, and applying design movements to specific design tasks.

Senior units of study

DECO2010 Designing Social Media


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Madeleine Borthwick Session: Intensive June,Semester 1 Classes: Lecture 1 hr/wk; tutorial 2 hrs/wk Assessment: Social Media Project (75%); Tutorial Activities (10%); Quizzes (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

This unit provides students with an understanding of principles and technologies relevant to the design of social media, that is, media supporting social interaction. The unit covers the history and theory of social networks, techniques and methods for analysing social media networks, design principles and patterns for the creation of social media applications, and the development and delivery of social media strategy. Students will gain proficiency designing social media platforms and usage scenarios that solve a range of design challenges. Students will participate in, critically review and prototype social media platforms and content to demonstrate their understanding of the subject matter.

DECO2015 Design for Innovation


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Cara Wrigley Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures 1 hr/week; tutorials 2 hrs/week Assessment: Analysis report (35%); Project work (55%); Quizzes (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

This unit of study introduces students to design strategies and techniques for developing alternative points of view and exploring multiple solutions iteratively. Through the analysis of real-world case studies students will develop an understanding for how to use design-thinking methods to tackle complex problems. The unit will discuss how design can be used as a method and as a way of thinking to drive innovation for products, services and processes. In the tutorial component, students will apply design strategies and techniques, such as lateral thinking, experiential prototyping and speculative design, through small group exercises. Students will develop a deep understanding of these strategies and techniques through the various assessment items, which capture theory, analytical reflection and the practical application of methods.

DECO3101 Innovation Design Studio


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Cara Wrigley Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Winter Main Classes: Lecture 1 hr/week; tutorial 2 hrs/week Assessment: Project work (90%); Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

This unit of study provides a format for deep engagement with design and innovation methods. Students will develop responses to a real-world design problem that requires the application of students' existing disciplinary skills combined with knowledge in an interdisciplinary context. Projects are student-led, allowing students to identify projects that are linked to their interests and discipline-specific career paths. Through interactive group work, facilitated by experienced design mentors, students will learn how to negotiate interdisciplinary requirements and boundaries. All projects developed in this unit of study are expected to address some element of innovation in an existing product, service or process. Students will be able to apply methods acquired in other units of study, and will learn about new methods through weekly project work and reviews.

DESN3000 Design Thinking for Health and Medicine


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Cara Wrigley Session: Semester 1 Classes: lecture 1 hr/week; seminar 2 hrs/week Assessment: case study report (30%), design exercise (30%) and health design project (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

This unit is an introduction to human-centred design methods, specifically in the context of future challenges of the type you will face in careers health and medicine. You will learn design principles and practices through evaluating current health and medical devices, processes and systems. Through the analysis of real-world case studies, you will apply design thinking methods to address the complex health and medical issues facing society. The unit will also introduce you to how design-led strategies can support healthy behaviour or be used to improve medical technologies and processes. You will develop your skills by using design exercises to demonstrate the strategic and practical applications of such methods and approaches.

DESN3001 Health and Medicine Design Studio


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Cara Wrigley Session: Semester 2 Classes: lecture 1 hr/week; studio 2 hrs/week Prerequisites: DESN3000 Assessment: project work (90%) and participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

This unit of study focuses on the development of design solutions for the complex needs of a healthy society into the future. Through weekly teaching of design in the health and medical contexts, you will be exposed to various methods, techniques and approaches to achieve patient-centric solutions. You will apply your skills to address a health or medical challenge by creating a project based on translating a discovery into a device or process in the real world. The project will require you to work in multi-disciplinary teams to allow you to harness the relevant skill sets that are required to best navigate multifaceted challenges prevalent in health and medical sectors. All solutions designed and developed in this unit of study are expected to take the form of either a product, service, or system. You will learn how to identify problems, how to use ideation for developing patient-centric solutions and how to translate ideas into prototypes. Along this journey you will also navigate disciplinary boundaries and communicate with various stakeholders, including the health and medical professions. This will allow you to assess and test your solutions on your target audience.

DECO3665 Graduation Show


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Karla Straker Session: Semester 2 Classes: Studio 2 hrs/wk Prerequisites: 48 credit points Assessment: Project Work (40%); Reflective Report (30%); Participation (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

This unit of study is tailored to self-motivate students with an emphasis on more peer assessment and open critique sessions than is conventional in Design Computing electives. This is purposefully intended to encourage graduating students to experience a collaborative project similar to a small design studio. Students will be expected to articulate and defend their designs in a conversational manner and to vote on solutions internally. Students will also practice organisational and project management skills impacted by real-world deadlines for print-schedules, sponsorship and funding, concurrent website deployment, online registrations and event management.

DECO3666 Graduate Internship


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kazjon Grace Session: Intensive February,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Fieldwork Prerequisites: 48 credit points Assessment: Log book signed by practice supervisor and report on the benefits of the internship (100); pass/fail only Mode of delivery: Professional practice

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

The aims of the internship are to provide a direct link between the academic core of the course and disciplines and methods of practice; to enable candidates to experience aspects of practice and provide opportunity for them to work in areas of the field outside their specific expertise; to enable candidates to observe, analyse and comment on the interaction between theoretical and practical issues for their Program as it is practices, and to establish connections between practice and the development of relevant research programs. The internship is intended to provide the opportunity for students to work in various situations in their Program's area. A secondary intention is that students use the opportunities of placement to broaden their own experience beyond the limitations of their chosen discipline. Candidates must find a suitable professional placement. Permission to enrol is given after the proposed placement has been approved by the Program Director. The host organisation will nominate a supervisor for the student for the internship. The student must complete at least 120 hours of full or part-time experience, supervised by a practising designer. A log-book of each day's work, signed by the supervisor must be submitted on completion. A 2000-word report on the benefits of the internship must also be produced. At the end of the internship the student will: demonstrate that they have completed a program of work (through a log book); present a report; analyse their experiences and compare these to the theoretical content of the units they have completed, and suggest appropriate research directions so as to improve the complementarity of theory to practice.

DECO3441 Design Computing Independent Study A


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kazjon Grace Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Weekly meetings by arrangement Prerequisites: 48 credit points and WAM of at least 70. Assessment: Report or equivalent (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

This unit provides an opportunity to high achieving students to develop an interest in a specific Design Computing topic; to develop skills in independent study; and to develop advanced report writing skills.
This elective is undertaken with an agreement between the student and a supervisor on an agreed topic related to Design Computing. The student will meet with the supervisor weekly to discuss progress.
The outcome should be a reflective report on a selected topic demonstrating mastery of the topic.

DECO3442 Design Computing Independent Study B


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kazjon Grace Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Weekly meetings by arrangement Prerequisites: 48 credit points and WAM of at least 70. Assessment: Report or equivalent (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

This unit provides an opportunity to high achieving students to develop an interest in a specific Design Computing topic; to develop skills in independent study; and to develop advanced report writing skills.
This elective is undertaken with an agreement between the student and a supervisor on an agreed topic related to Design Computing. The student will meet with the supervisor weekly to discuss progress.
The outcome should be a reflective report on a selected topic demonstrating mastery of the topic.

DECO3443 Design Computing Independent Study C


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kazjon Grace Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Weekly meetings by arrangement Prerequisites: 48 credit points and WAM of at least 70. Assessment: Report or equivalent (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

This unit provides an opportunity to high achieving students to develop an interest in a specific Design Computing topic; to develop skills in independent study; and to develop advanced report writing skills.
This elective is undertaken with an agreement between the student and a supervisor on an agreed topic related to Design Computing. The student will meet with the supervisor weekly to discuss progress.
The outcome should be a reflective report on a selected topic demonstrating mastery of the topic.

DECO3444 Design Computing Independent Study D


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kazjon Grace Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Weekly meetings by arrangement Prerequisites: 48 credit points and WAM of at least 70. Assessment: Report or equivalent (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

This unit provides an opportunity to high achieving students to develop an interest in a specific Design Computing topic; to develop skills in independent study; and to develop advanced report writing skills.
This elective is undertaken with an agreement between the student and a supervisor on an agreed topic related to Design Computing. The student will meet with the supervisor weekly to discuss progress.
The outcome should be a reflective report on a selected topic demonstrating mastery of the topic.

DECO3551 Design Computing General Elective A


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kazjon Grace Session: Semester 1,Semester 1a,Semester 1b,Semester 2,Semester 2a,Semester 2b Prerequisites: 48 credit points of units of study Assessment: Assignments as determined by Unit Coordinator (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

This elective allows a group of students to pursue a topic proposed by a member of academic staff in a formal learning environment.
This unit of study is available to a minimum of 10 students to engage in a topic related to Design Computing that is organised by a member of academic staff. This allows a member of staff to teach a topic of special interest or for a visiting academic to teach a subject related to their specialty. Students will participate in lectures, tutorials, or other activities as needed to pursue the elective topic. The topic for this elective is proposed by a member of academic staff and approved by the Associate Dean (Undergraduate).
Students will develop an understanding of a special topic through reports, projects, and tutorial exercises.

DECO3552 Design Computing General Elective B


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kazjon Grace Session: Semester 1,Semester 1a,Semester 1b,Semester 2,Semester 2a,Semester 2b Prerequisites: 48 credit points of units of study Assessment: Assignments as determined by Unit Coordinator (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

This elective allows a group of students to pursue a topic proposed by a member of academic staff in a formal learning environment.
This unit of study is available to a minimum of 10 students to engage in a topic related to Design Computing that is organised by a member of academic staff. This allows a member of staff to teach a topic of special interest or for a visiting academic to teach a subject related to their specialty. Students will participate in lectures, tutorials, or other activities as needed to pursue the elective topic. The topic for this elective is proposed by a member of academic staff and approved by the Associate Dean (Undergraduate).
Students will develop an understanding of a special topic through reports, projects, and tutorial exercises.

DECO3553 Design Computing General Elective C


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kazjon Grace Session: Semester 1,Semester 1a,Semester 1b,Semester 2,Semester 2a,Semester 2b Prerequisites: 48 credit points of units of study Assessment: Assignments as determined by Unit Coordinator (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

This elective allows a group of students to pursue a topic proposed by a member of academic staff in a formal learning environment. This unit of study is available to a minimum of 10 students to engage in a topic related to Design Computing that is organised by a member of academic staff. This allows a member of staff to teach a topic of special interest or for a visiting academic to teach a subject related to their specialty. Students will participate in lectures, tutorials, or other activities as needed to pursue the elective topic. The topic for this elective is proposed by a member of academic staff and approved by the Associate Dean (Undergraduate). Students will develop an understanding of a special topic through reports, projects, and tutorial exercises.

DECO3554 Design Computing General Elective D


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kazjon Grace Session: Semester 1,Semester 1a,Semester 1b,Semester 2,Semester 2a,Semester 2b Prerequisites: 48 credit points of units of study Assessment: Assignments as determined by Unit Coordinator (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

This elective allows a group of students to pursue a topic proposed by a member of academic staff in a formal learning environment. This unit of study is available to a minimum of 10 students to engage in a topic related to Design Computing that is organised by a member of academic staff. This allows a member of staff to teach a topic of special interest or for a visiting academic to teach a subject related to their specialty. Students will participate in lectures, tutorials, or other activities as needed to pursue the elective topic. The topic for this elective is proposed by a member of academic staff and approved by the Associate Dean (Undergraduate). Students will develop an understanding of a special topic through reports, projects, and tutorial exercises.

School electives

Junior units of study

AWSS1001 Architectural Sketching and Drawing


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Koji Ryui Session: Semester 1 Classes: Workshop 3 hrs/wk Prohibitions: DESA1601 or DESA1602 Assessment: Portfolio of works (60%); process journal (40%) Practical field work: Studio practice Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

Note: Students may incur costs for materials in some Art Workshops units.

This unit aims to provide the student with the knowledge, skills and aptitude required to use a range of fundamental architectural sketching and drawing skills based on observation of the physical world, in particular the built world. Students will be encouraged to develop a commitment to the practice of drawing as a fundamental design skill through 13 studio classes coupled with independent study. The workshop places an emphasis on keen observation, experimental use of materials and engagement with historical frameworks used in design practice in design and architecture. Exposure in studio to the sensitivities offered by different drawing materials and techniques will give students the competency to more confidently use drawing as a communication device. Skills in perspective drawing are introduced and drawing is used to document the visible world and define structure and detail. On successful completion of this unit of study students will have demonstrated familiarity with a range of drawing media and techniques, including charcoal, graphite, pen, brush and ink, and an introduction to colour. Students will understand the importance of maintaining a sketchbook as a site to record all their visual and conceptual research, and in which to draw on a daily basis as a means to develop ideas and technical proficiency.

DESA1004 Designing with Surfaces and Light


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Wenye Hu Session: Semester 2,Summer Main,Winter Main Classes: Online. Expected total workload is approximately 35 hours online, plus independent study and preparation. Lecture materials are available on the eLearning site. They consist of PDF files and Powerpoint slides. No lecture recordings are available. Prohibitions: DESA2612 Assessment: Assignment 1 (40%), Assignment 2 (60%) Mode of delivery: Online

Note: Due to the high volume of interest in this course, all questions and enquiries will be answered in online discussion forums on eLearning, instead of in face-to-face consultation. No early results are available for this unit. No extensions will be granted because of failed internet access.

Objects only become visible when light reflects off of them. This unit explores the ways in which light interacts with surfaces, objects, and the human visual system. Architectural design decisions regarding the lighting, as well as exterior and interior surfaces of a building, alter the perceptual experience of users and should be done thoughtfully.
This unit introduces students to the way humans perceive and experience the built environment. It covers some of the fundamental properties of light, mechanisms of human perception, and the ways that light interacts with surfaces. The application of these topics to design decisions is also discussed. Students demonstrate their understanding of the presented material and apply their knowledge to critically analyze their own environments.

Senior units of study

AWSS2015 Generative Drawing


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Koji Ryui Session: Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: Workshop 3 hrs/wk Assessment: Portfolio (60%); Process Journal (40%) Practical field work: Studio practice NB: Students may incur costs for materials in some units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

This unit explores a variety of drawing skills with an emphasis on materials and techniques as tools for generative and process-based work related to drawing as a fundamental medium and method in design. Drawing is approached as a system for critical analysis, research and design speculation. The focus is on the formal aspects of composition and perspective while the material nature of drawing is explored as a balance between chance and control. Students use a wide variety of mark-making methods to render line, tonal value and texture. Students are provided with the opportunity to combine observational skills with experimental techniques in order to encourage a personal vision and a commitment to the practice of drawing in design. Each technique and approach will be presented against a background of Architecture and Art history and theory.

AWSS2020 Object Design (Material and Light)


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Koji Ryui Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Workshop 3 hrs/wk Corequisites: DESA1555 Prohibitions: DESA2643 Assessment: Portfolio of works and presentation (60%); process journal and associated assignments (40%) Practical field work: Studio practice NB: Students may incur costs for materials in some units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

In this unit students produce light objects exploring diverse materials and fabrication techniques in the DMaF workshops. Emphasis is placed on developing and inter-relating manufacturing and artisan skills with research, analysis and design development. The course aims to develop a critical awareness of the nature of objects that surround us, exploring cultural, contextual and symbolic aspects of object design as well as functional and aesthetic qualities working with light. Sustainability and social issues relating to their manufacture, use and disposal are also discussed; the unit aims to increase appreciation of the materiality of objects focusing on timber as an example paying attention to associated environmental and ethical issues, and emerging alternative materials. Through a series of exercises, experiments and production of their major project, students develop knowledge of construction techniques and skills in using wood/plastics tools and machinery and in so doing, build an awareness of industrial and craft practices and how they impact on the design process and outcome. Students will be expected to produce a research process journal and report on how a particular designer/s or movement has informed or influenced their final project/s.

AWSS2023 Architectural Photography


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Koji Ryui Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: Workshop 3 hrs/wk Prohibitions: DESA2629 Assessment: Process Journal and associated assignments (40%); final project and presentation (60%) Practical field work: Studio practice NB: Students may incur costs for materials in some units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

This practical unit assumes students have little or no understanding of photo image making. It aims to give students an understanding of how photography functions as a contemporary visual medium, including its connection to modernism and architecture. Students will gain knowledge of the principles and practise of camera operations, the production of high quality black and white prints in small studio style classes. This module covers the use of a 35mm DSLR camera, image composition, use of lighting, image capture and correction, and printing. Practical work includes completion of set class projects, gallery visits, class discussions and the production of a portfolio. *Students should have access to a 35mm DSLR camera.

AWSS2026 2D Print Processes in Design


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Koji Ryui Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: Workshop 3 hrs/wk Prohibitions: DESA2638 Assessment: Research Journal (30%); portfolio of Studio Works (70%) Practical field work: Studio practice NB: Students may incur costs for materials in some units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

This studio-based unit introduces a variety of traditional and experimental techniques that will enable students to design and print a series of 2D works both within and around the context of design and Architecture. It will provide students with the knowledge and skills to design and print on a variety of substrates including paper, wood, and perspex through a range of techniques and creative exercises that can be developed into an edition or a series of experimental printed works. Students will also explore the historical roots of print and print as an element in design and architecture. Techniques covered include: digital photography and vector illustration, typography, hand and laser-cut paper stencils, ink mixing, registration and print set-up for multi-coloured prints. Through studio practice, set exercises, illustrated talks, gallery visits and library research, students will develop an understanding of their creative process and ability to interpret ideas through the medium of printing and with particular focus on design and architecture applications.

AWSS2027 Arch + Design Material Processes (Casting)


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Koji Ryui Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Workshop 3 hrs/wk Prohibitions: DESA2636 Assessment: Studio Projects and associated tasks (70%); Research Process Journal (30%) Practical field work: Studio practice NB: Students may incur costs for materials in some units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

This studio-based unit focuses on critical engagement with materiality and form. The course introduces fundamental knowledge and technical skills for students to produce a series of 3D objects through high-definition casting and complimentary construction techniques. Students will work with a broad range of traditional and experimental materials including wax, silicone, metal, sand and plaster. Emphasis is placed on developing students' material and spatial awareness of three-dimensional forms in context and investigating their conceptual meanings and applications. Students will be required to design, plan and produce a series of sculptural works, utilizing mediums and techniques explored throughout the semester. Additionally, students will critically contextualise and discuss their projects against historical precedents and contemporary practices that inform their creative inquiries.

DESC9011 Audio Production


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Densil Cabrera Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture 3 hrs/wk Assessment: Two assignments (1x40%, 1x50%); in-class quizzes and exercises (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

This unit examines tools, techniques, processes and value systems involved in audio production. Proficiency in sound recording techniques, including field and studio recordings, is developed, including technical acoustic, audio and aesthetic considerations. Students extend their understanding and experience of production principles by which sound recordings are used for building up realistic and hyper-realistic auditory scenes. Perspectives on audio production come from aesthetics, practice, acoustics theory, audio technology and digital audio systems, but ultimately are founded in the discipline of listening. By bringing these perspectives together, this unit is designed for students with a wide range of production experience at a postgraduate level.
Students are expected to work individually and in groups to produce audio for accompanying screen media, as well as audio works that rely solely on audio to transmit a message. Students are expected to: participate in the workshops; complete class exercises/constructions; read additional materials to discuss in classes; submit a script, composition or otherwise detailed proposal for recording and postproduction with detailed rationale of production values; produce and present a completed audio project, including documentation, evidence of background research, a commentary on the production and production outcomes, track sheets, mixing notes.

Other electives

Junior units of study

ANTH1001 Cultural Difference: An Introduction


Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive July,Semester 1,Summer Main,Winter Main Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: ANTH1003 Assessment: 10x100wd weekly online exercises (20%), 1x1500wd essay (35%), 1x2hr exam (35%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Anthropology explores and explains cultural difference while affirming the unity of humankind. It provides accounts of cultural specificity that illuminate the world today. Lectures will address some examples of cultural difference from the present and the past. These examples will introduce modern Anthropology, the method of ethnography, and its related forms of social and cultural analysis.

ARHT1001 Style and Substance: Introducing Art History


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 2x1000wd object analysis (40%), 1x2500wd research project (50%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

Taking a diverse, global view of art making from the Ancient to the Modern world, ARHT1001 will introduce students to key philosophical and methodological approaches in the field of Art History. As our experiences are increasingly mediated through a variety of visual platforms, this course will help students develop critical perspectives on visual communication. The development of professional skill sets will be a key focus. As such, the course serves as an essential introduction to Art History for those considering a career in the arts, education, or the museum and design sectors.

ARHT1002 Shock of the Now: Global Art since 1900


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr Lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x1000wd Visual Test (30%), 1x2000wd research essay (40%), 1x1500wd Exhibition/Artwork Review Blog (20%), 1x Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

Art shapes our cities, streets, galleries, phones and minds. It is now made with every conceivable material, and sometimes none at all. It shocks, challenges, soothes, entertains, engrosses and overwhelms us. This unit charts the history of Modern and Contemporary Art across the world, as it is shaped by and shapes society, politics and environment. It shows current concerns in art , with materials, landscape, self-image, politics, and the body are grounded in a century of global experiment

ENGL1011 Introduction to Film Studies


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x800wd exercise (20%), 1x800wd exercise (20%), 1x800wd exercise (20%), 1x2000wd Take-home exercise (30%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

How do form and style structure our experience of film? This unit provides a critical introduction to elements of film making and viewing, moving through an exploration of formal components of film to consider film aesthetics in relation to the history of film scholarship. We will consider films in a variety of cultural and historical contexts, from early cinema to youtube, and introduce a series of "case studies" to explore historical, cultural and material contexts of film production and consumption.

GCST1601 Introduction to Cultural Studies


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1xonline reflective learning journal equivalent to 2000wds (40%), 1xgroup presentation (10%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

Cultural studies explores everyday life, media and popular culture. It shows us how we can make sense of contemporary culture as producers, consumers, readers and viewers, in relation to our identities and communities. How do various cultural texts and practices convey different kinds of meaning and value? Drawing upon key approaches in the field, students will learn how to analyse cultural forms such as advertising, television, film and popular music.

LNGS1002 Language and Social Context


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 5x250wd short assignments (40%), 1x1hr 1000wd equivalent mid-term exam (20%), 1x2hr 2000wd equivalent Final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

This unit introduces the study of the interrelationship between language and society. It is concerned with phenomena of language change and how that leads to varieties in a language. How are these varieties linked to social differences? What distinguishes male speech from female speech or what are the linguistic styles of different social classes or ethnic groups? What is slang, or jargon, and what distinguishes a casual conversation from an interview?

PHIL1013 Society, Knowledge and Self


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: PHIL1010 Assessment: Tutorial participation (10%), 1x2000wd Essay (30%) and 1x2hr exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

This unit is an introduction to central issues in political philosophy, theories of knowledge and philosophical conceptions of the self. The first part will consider the state, freedom and political obligation. The second part will examine some of the major theories of knowledge in the modern philosophical tradition. The final section will look at conceptions of the self as a knowing and acting subject.

PRFM1601 Making Theatre: Process and Collaboration


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr workshop/week Assessment: 1x1000wd short essay (25%), 1x1000wd workshop description and analysis (25%),1x group work documentation (1500wd per student)(25%), 1x1000wd account of rehearsal (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

A guided rehearsal of a play by Bertolt Brecht introduces you to key approaches to theatre and performance studies, including embodiment theory, ethnography, and dramaturgy. You will reflect upon and analyse performance-making processes, debating, testing and documenting decisions as you work. No theatre-making experience required.

SCLG1001 Introduction to Sociology 1


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x1000wd library task (20%), 1x1500wd research essay (30%), 1x2hr exam (40%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

How does society shape the world we live in? What influences interactions between people in everyday life? Why is society structured the way it is, and is change possible? By delving into diverse topics such as discrimination and inequality to family life and friendship, this unit introduces the conceptual tools sociologists use to explain the world.

SCLG1002 Introduction to Sociology 2


Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive July,Semester 2,Summer Main,Winter Main Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x1000wd annotated bibliography (20%), 1x1750wd take-home exercise (35%), 1x1750wd research essay (35%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

In a rapidly changing world, how do we make sense of current social and political problems effectively? By exploring sociological concepts in creative ways, this unit gives students the tools to analyse, research and respond to real world issues such as globalisation, crime, social justice, community breakdown, and racial, sexual and indigenous inequality.

WRIT1000 Introduction to Academic Writing


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x900wd sentence task (20%), 1x900wd research task (20%), 1x900wd paragraph task (20%), 1x900wd review task (20%), 1x900wd revision/reflection task (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

This unit teaches the fundamentals of academic writing. Frequent, short writing assignments are designed to help students engage with the writing process at the sentence and paragraph levels and and to make appropriate style, grammar, punctuation, and syntax choices. Students will learn how to research a topic, document sources in keeping with academic honesty principles, and edit and revise their own writing, as well as the writing of others. This UoS is appropriate for both native and non-native English speakers and offers a solid foundation for academic writing in any discipline.

INFS1000 Digital Business Innovation


Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2hr lecture and 1x 1hr lab workshop per week Prohibitions: ISYS1003 or INFO1000 Assumed knowledge: INFO1000; INFO1003; INFO1903 Assessment: group work (10%), group project (25%), mid-semester test (25%), and final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Block mode

The Digital Economy, with its focus on information as a key business resource, has changed the way Business Information Systems (BIS) are viewed in organisations. BIS are now seen as enablers of innovation in which people, supported by powerful technology, are considered to be the most important component. This is because problem-solving, innovation and critical thinking skills cannot be outsourced or easily acquired by competitors. This unit is designed to develop your understanding of how businesses operate. It shows how information systems support business operations and management through integration of people, business processes and systems. You will be provided with an introduction to state-of-the art business analysis techniques, frameworks and models to assist in understanding the nature and contribution of BIS in a range of business contexts. With its emphasis on business rather than IT, this unit does not require prior IT-related experience. In this unit you will learn about the increasingly important role of IT in business and acquire valuable business analysis and problem-solving skills.

MKTG1001 Marketing Principles


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2hr lecture and 1x 1hr tutorial per week Assessment: project (20%), presentation (15%), participation (7%), mid-semester exam (28%), final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

This unit examines the relationships among marketing organisations and final consumers in terms of production-distribution channels or value chains. It focuses on consumer responses to various marketing decisions (product mixes, price levels, distribution channels, promotions, etc.) made by private and public organisations to create, develop, defend, and sometimes eliminate, product markets. Emphasis is placed on identifying new ways of satisfying the needs and wants, and creating value for consumers. While this unit is heavily based on theory, practical application of the concepts to "real world" situations is also essential. Specific topics of study include: market segmentation strategies; market planning; product decisions; new product development; branding strategies; channels of distribution; promotion and advertising; pricing strategies; and customer database management.

ELEC1103 Fundamentals of Elec and Electronic Eng


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: Basic knowledge of differentiation & integration, and HSC Physics Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

This unit of study aims to develop knowledge of the fundamental concepts and building blocks of electrical and electronics circuits. This is a foundation unit in circuit theory. Circuit theory is the electrical engineer's fundamental tool.
The concepts learnt in this unit will be made use of heavily in many units of study (in later years) in the areas of electronics, instrumentation, electrical machines, power systems, communication systems, and signal processing.
Topics: a) Basic electrical and electronic circuit concepts: Circuits, circuit elements, circuit laws, node and mesh analysis, circuit theorems, energy storage, capacitors and inductors, circuits with switches, transient response, sine waves and complex analysis, phasors, impedance, ac power. ; b) Project management, teamwork, ethics; c) Safety issues

ELEC1601 Introduction to Computer Systems


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics extension 1 or 2 Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

This unit of study introduces the fundamental digital concepts upon which the design and operation of modern digital computers are based. A prime aim of the unit is to develop a professional view of, and a capacity for inquiry into, the field of computing.
Topics covered include: data representation, basic computer organisation, the CPU, elementary gates and logic, machine language, assembly language and high level programming constructs.

INFO1110 Introduction to Programming


Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: lectures, laboratories, seminars Assessment: through semester assessment (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

This unit is an essential starting point for software developers, IT consultants, and computer scientists to build their understanding of principle computer operation. Students will obtain knowledge and skills with procedural programming. Crucial concepts include defining data types, control flow, iteration, functions, recursion, the model of addressable memory. Students will be able to reinterpret a general problem into a computer problem, and use their understanding of the computer model to develop source code. This unit trains students with software development process, including skills of testing and debugging. It is a prerequisite for more advanced programming languages, systems programming, computer security and high performance computing.

INFO1113 Object-Oriented Programming


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: lectures, laboratories, seminars Prerequisites: INFO1110 Prohibitions: INFO1103 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 Assessment: through semester assessment (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

Object-oriented (OO) programming is a technique that arranges code into classes, each encapsulating in one place related data and the operations on that data. Inheritance is used to reuse code from a more general class, in specialised situations. Most modern programming languages provide OO features. Understanding and using these are an essential skill to software developers in industry. This unit provides the student with the concepts and individual programming skills in OO programming, starting from their previous mastery of procedural programming.

DATA1002 Informatics: Data and Computation


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Project Work - own time Prohibitions: INFO1903 Assessment: through semester assessment (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

This unit covers computation and data handling, integrating sophisticated use of existing productivity software, e.g. spreadsheets, with the development of custom software using the general-purpose Python language. It will focus on skills directly applicable to data-driven decision-making. Students will see examples from many domains, and be able to write code to automate the common processes of data science, such as data ingestion, format conversion, cleaning, summarization, creation and application of a predictive model.

MTRX1702 Mechatronics 1


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prohibitions: ELEC1101 or ELEC2602 or COSC1902 or COSC1002 Assumed knowledge: MTRX1701 Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

This unit of study aims to provide a foundation for the study of systems and embedded programming for the degree in Mechatronic Engineering.
It is based around a systems engineering approach to requirements capture, software design, implementation, debugging and testing in the context of the C programming language. Problem definition and decomposition; the design process; designing for testing and defensive coding methods; modular code structure and abstract data types; best practice in programming. Programming in teams; documentation and version control.
The C language: Preprocessor, tokens, storage classes and types; arithmetic, relational and bit manipulation operators; constructs for control flow: if, switch, for, do and while; arrays; pointers and character strings; dynamic memory allocation; functions and parameter passing; derived storage classes: structures and unions; file I/O.

PSYC1001 Psychology 1001


Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive June,Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week, plus 1 hour per week of additional web-based (self-paced) material related to the tutorial. Assessment: One 2.5hr exam, one 1000 word research report, multiple tutorial tests, experimental participation (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

Psychology 1001 is a general introduction to the main topics and methods of psychology, and is the basis for advanced work as well as being of use to those not proceeding with the subject. Psychology 1001 covers the following areas: science and statistics in psychology; applied psychology; themes in the history of psychology; social psychology; personality theory; human development. This unit is also offered in the Sydney Summer School. For more information consult the web site: http://sydney.edu.au/summer_school/

Textbooks

Available on-line once semester commences

PSYC1002 Psychology 1002


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week, plus 1 hour per week of additional web-based (self-paced) material related to the tutorial. Assessment: One 2.5hr exam, one 1000 word research report, multiple tutorial tests, experimental participation (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

Note: This unit is also offered in the Sydney Summer School. For more information consult the web site: http://sydney.edu.au/summer/

Psychology 1002 is a further general introduction to the main topics and methods of psychology, and it is the basis for advanced work as well as being of use to those not proceeding with the subject. Psychology 1002 covers the following areas: neuroscience; human mental abilities; learning and motivation; visual perception; cognitive processes; abnormal psychology.
This unit is also offered in the Sydney Summer School. For more information consult the web site:
http://sydney.edu.au/summer_school/

Textbooks

Available on-line once semester commences

MUSC1503 Fundamentals of Music 1


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Rojas Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1hr lecture and 2x 1hr tutorials (aural and written)/wk Prohibitions: MUSC1000 or MUSC1001 or MUSC1002 or MUSC1003 or MUSC1004 or MUSC1005 or MUSC1501 or MUSC1502 or MUSC2699 or MCGY1008 Assessment: Written and online music theory assessment (70%), aural assessment (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

An introduction to basic music literacy skills, including learning to read and write music, and an understanding of fundamental aspects of its structure and composition. The material covered in this unit of study concentrates upon the basics of music theory and listening to ensure that participants have a solid grounding for a firm understanding of music notation and organisation.

MUED1002 Creative Music Technology


Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Benjamin Carey Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 hr lab/studio/wk Assessment: Creative Audio Assignment (70%), Formative Skills Assessment (20%), Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

In this unit of study students will be introduced to a range of music technologies and gain a basic proficiency in sound recording, editing and mixing. Students will learn to work with audio in a digital audio workstation, how to make good quality recordings with portable recording devices, and make use of these skills in service of a creative outcome. The unit will include an overview of software for notation/sequencing, as well as basic sound synthesis concepts. In the final assessment students will explore the creative possibilities of music technology by realising a sound work using either instrumental and/or environmental sound recorded and edited by them.

MUSC1507 Sounds, Screens, Speakers: Music and Media


Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Charles Fairchild Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2hr lecture and 1 tut/wk Prohibitions: MUSC1000 or MUSC1001 or MUSC1502 Assessment: Article summary, 1000 words (25%); Critical analysis, 1000 words (25%); Tutorial test, 500 words (10%); Final Project, 2,000 words(30%), overall participation (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day

Music has been dramatically shaped and reshaped by every major change in communications technology in the 20th century from vinyl discs to MP3s. In this unit of study we will analyse such issues as the ways in which the early recording industry transformed jazz, the blues and country music, how the presentation of music on radio and television changed the ways the music industry created new musical celebrities, and the challenges the music industry faces as digital technology transforms the creation, distribution and consumption of music.

Other electives

Senior units of study

ARIN2610 Internet Transformations


Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 18 Junior credit points in any of Anthropology, Art History, Computer Science, Design Computing, English, Gender and Culture Studies, History, Information Systems, Information Technology, Linguistics, Media and Communication, Philosophy, Psychology or Sociology or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Digital Cultures Prohibitions: ARIN2100 Assessment:

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