Counting Words In An Essay

What is Word Counter Tool.com?

Word Counter Tool.com is a simple online utility to count number of words or number of characters online. You can either type in to Word Counter Tool.com or copy and paste content in to the application to count words and characters. You can also count the number of characters and words you type in minutes and seconds to find your typing speed. So Word Counter Tool.com is an integrated Word Per Minute / WPM calculator and word and character counter. You can also change case of the paragraph to UPPERCASE or lowercase.

Why use Word Counter Tool.com?

In daily life, you will face many situations where you need to find the number of words, characters and change case in a given paragraph. WordCounterTool.com comes handy in these situations and you can easily count words and characters on the fly online. You don't require additional software like MS Word and this service is provided free.

Word Counter Tool.com is the only word and character counter utility that displays the count in real time.

Can you tell me some real time use of Word Counter Tool.com?

Word Counter Tool is the perfect companion for your English essay assignments in School. If you need to write a 400-450 word essay and have to stick to the limits, use Word Counter Tool.com to type your essay. If you use Firefox browser, you even have spell checking enabled.

If you are a professional blogger or content writer, then you can use Word Counter Tool.com to type your content. Most of these services require a word limit and you can use our tool for free and get paid for the great content you produce.

If you are a web master, then you can Word Counter Tool.com to find the number of words in your Title tags and Description for Search Engine Optimization (SEO) efforts.

Word Counter Tool.com is probably the only online application to change case of a paragraph and words online. With a mere click of the button, an entire paragraph can change text case or font formatting to UPPERCASE or lowercase online. No need of opening Microsoft Word to change text case.

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Someone told me that when you're counting words in an essay, words such as "a", "the", "and", "to" do not count. Is this statement correct?

No, that statement isn't true. In a 500-word essay, "little words" like articles, conjunctions, and prepositions will typically make up about 20% of the total in the document—that's a huge amount to ignore! We've never heard of anyone counting words by leaving the little ones out.

What we have heard before are questions about how some kinds of words—like contractions, hyphenated words, and numbers—are counted. Here's some more information about these special cases.

Contractions: Contractions (such as "don't" and "I'll") are generally considered to be one word.

Hyphenated words: There's varying opinions about these. Some people would say "first-class" counts as one word, others say two. To be on the safe side, if you're short on words count them as one and if you're running over count them as two. People rarely consider longer hyphenated phrases, such as "devil-may-care," to be simply one word. If each part of a hyphenated word isn't a full word itself (as in "de-emphasize"), you should count the hyphenated word as one.

Numbers: Numbers expressed as numerals (1990, 19,582, 28) count as one word.

Abbreviations and acronyms: Abbreviations, like S.H.S. for "Smithville High School," are usually counted as if they were written out. However, common acronyms (like IBM and NAACP) that are used more often than the full name of the organization are often counted as one word.

Initials: Initials are counted as a full word. "George W. Bush" would be considered three words.

Titles: The title of your essay usually won't count towards the word limit.

An admissions office will probably use one of a few methods to count words. If they want an exact count, they may go through the document and count each word, either by hand or more likely by using a computer program. Or, they may count the number of words in a part of the document and use that information to estimate the total. For example, they might count the words in the first five lines, divide by five to figure out an average number of words per line, and then multiply the words per line by the total number of lines in the essay. Finally, an admissions officer may simply eyeball a document to make sure that it's the expected length (taking into account smaller fonts or margins). There are about 600-700 words in a single-spaced page written in 12-point font, so a 500 word essay should be shorter than a page.

Admissions officers generally don't have time to count words in the thousands of essays they read, so they're most likely to use the last method, if they care about the length of an essay at all. However, be wary of using that fact as an invitation to go over the word limit—there are some real sticklers out there. While a college would be unlikely to reject you simply because you used too many words, it makes a bad impression on some people and may indicate that you don't follow directions, aren't detail-oriented, or aren't respecting the admissions officer's time.

Related links:

Finding and Removing Unnecessary Words

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